Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Archive for August, 2016

Skyscapes

Recently I had the pleasure of running a few “mini workshops” for the Placerville Arts Association. With only three hours there’s a limited amount of material and concepts that can be covered. The watercolor workshop focused in on creating skyscape’s. Watercolor, by its very nature, lends itself beautifully to the interpretations of clouds, time of day and weather.

Composition and value end up being the primary elements to consider in a skyscape. The artwork needs to have a low horizon line, that sky needs to dominate at least two thirds of the composition. Value is the next key, the most value ‘contrast or pattern’ needs to occur up in the sky. It doesn’t mean that the ground doesn’t have some strong lights and darks, just make sure it is not busier than the sky. Clouds and weather are usually best done with a sensitive light hand, it takes some practice to do the wet into wet and not storm castle_1storm newMex_1aoverdo any lifting. Clouds become almost become calligraphic with loaded flats and rounds, and you need to let the paint find some happy accidents for you.

Here are two skyscapes that we’re done following the workshop. My recommendation is to always start 2 watercolor paintings, not simultaneously . . . rather start one and then work on the other while you are waiting for the first to dry. It really helps you to avoid the temptation to overwork them.

storm newMex_3The horizontal one had a lovely photograph that was used as reference, the vertical one used the sky that was happening around me that morning with ground plane referenced from a prior painting. Being inspired by the actual sky I was looking at produced, in my opinion, a slightly better painting. I like them both, I just like that one a little bit better.

storm castle_4

Save

Save

Save

Save

Save

Read Full Post »